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Culture Shock! How incongruous is the road that leads you home?

Writer- Aminu Darius
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3 min read

There are certain cultural practices peculiar to every tribe that would elicit a puzzled reaction from an outsider. 

For instance, in Tiv culture, it is customary for a husband to let his wife spend a night with his male guest. I don’t know if this culture is still practiced. In certain parts of Yoruba land, if someone farts, it is akin to them hurting themselves and if it is done in public, those around are supposed to console the farter ( I coined this word). Odd, right? An incident happened some years back that still leaves me wondering if an outsider would find certain cultural practices of my tribe repulsive.

When I was 10-years old, my friend, Abu, and I went to visit a mutual friend, Jamiu. The visit was occasioned by a football match we had agreed to play with kids from the next block. Jamiu, our star player, was conspicuously absent so our captain delegated two of us to go and fetch him.

READ: 10 bizarre practices around the world that will shock you

We went to Jamiu’s house and met them having lunch, Amala and stew made with chinge( termite). That was their delicacy so we weren’t surprised at the combo. They offered us food but we declined. We stated our mission and since he was almost done with his food, he told us to wait.

All of a sudden, we heard a thunderous sound. The walls vibrated and I can swear I felt an earth tremor. Guess where the sound emanated from? It came from Jamiu’s dad! The man unashamedly farted! No sooner had he farted than the entire family started saying, “Pele, Sir! Pele, Sir! Pele Sir! Pele, Sir!” In the Yoruba language “Pele” means “Sorry”.

An overpowering stench permeated the room. I was nauseous and I felt choked. It was as if I was in a gas chamber. While I was disgusted and beside myself with rage, Abu’s reaction was that of confusion, amusement, and disbelief. He started to giggle. When I saw him giggling, my disgust gave way to amusement and I almost burst into laughter but I managed to stifle it.

culture

Mama Jamiu looked at us angrily and said,” Won’t you say sorry? Don’t you have home training?” We said sorry to Baba Jamiu multiple times in quick succession. In fact, Abu and I tried to outdo each other in saying sorry, just to prove that we had home training.

READ: Why your home is not the Best

The smell that enveloped the room was suffocating. Just imagine the stench caused by the putrid smell of a carcass, the pungent smell of rotten eggs and stew made with termite. That was how bad the odor was and a miasma hung in the room until we left. If there were an infant in the room, I have no doubt that it would have choked to death.

READ: Dead Gaze! “Stop staring at my boobs”

In their culture, breaking wind, another word for farting, is seen as perfectly normal and nothing to be ashamed of. In another culture, it is mortifying and considered antisocial behavior.

Are there cultural practices peculiar to your tribe that you think an outsider would frown upon? Have your say in the comment section.

 

Note: This article was written by Aminu Darius, owner and publishing editor of Cevenade.com

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Darius
Darius
10 months ago

In my culture, we squat to greet our elders. We squat to listen to advice or instructions from an elder. We squat to say “thank you” to an elder. I never liked it and I got serious lashing when I was little for not squating when I should. As I got older, I stood my ground and stopped squatting. I just found it embarrassing and I still do. My cousins do not see anything wrong with it, so whenever we go out together and they squat to greet an elderly person, I squat too because I don’t want to be… Read more »

muttering minds
Admin
10 months ago
Reply to  Darius

🤣🤣🤣 I imagine the girls from your tribe would be gifted on their back side as a result of the numerous squats.

Darius
Darius
10 months ago

😂😂🤣🤣🤣🤣 nothing extraordinary about their backsides. It’s pretty much regular.

muttering minds
Admin
10 months ago
Reply to  Darius

What a waste of squats😫😫

Melody
Melody
10 months ago
Reply to  Darius

in my culture, you don’t pass in front of an elder when he’s eating.

muttering minds
Admin
10 months ago
Reply to  Melody

Maybe in the early days children stole meat with such tricks🤣🤣🤣🤣

Bubu
Bubu
10 months ago

The only weird cultural stuff I know has been abolished. No one practices it anymore.
In the past, when a man dies and he has some properties to his name. None of his children has the right to claim it. No matter how much or how little. The properties are given to the children of his sisters.

Darius
Darius
10 months ago
Reply to  Bubu

Where are you from though?

Bubu
Bubu
10 months ago
Reply to  Darius

Ohafia in Abia State.

muttering minds
Admin
10 months ago
Reply to  Bubu

I was taught this in Igbo language in school. I’m not sure but I think the tribe was Abriba.

Darius
Darius
10 months ago

Wow! Thank God it was abolished. Weird!

Bubu
Bubu
10 months ago

Yeah you’re right.

muttering minds
Admin
10 months ago
Reply to  Bubu

🤩🤩 I feel good to have been able to recall

Queenie
Queenie
10 months ago

In my tribe a son can’t use a walking stick while his father is still alive even if it’s just to compliment your outfit, it’s said you’re stepping on your father’s heart if you dare use a walking stick.

Darius
Darius
10 months ago
Reply to  Queenie

Really! Interesting!

muttering minds
Admin
10 months ago
Reply to  Queenie

🤣🤣🤣 heart ke! So wait o, not even for medical issues?

Nnaji Moses
Nnaji Moses
10 months ago

The weirdest I encountered while growing up was my grandfather’s earnest desire to receive a ‘thank you’ mixed with other forms of praise whenever he farted. He believed that the gas that he passes is death and its a good thing from the gods to fart.

muttering minds
Admin
10 months ago
Reply to  Nnaji Moses

🤣🤣🤣 not just ‘thank you’ but accolades too? Pls, what tribe are you from?

Darius
Darius
10 months ago

Nnaji is an Igbo name, so I guess he is Igbo.

Nnaji Moses
Nnaji Moses
10 months ago

Igbo of course

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